10 ways of binding homeschool books at home monkeyandmom

10 Ways to Bind Homeschool Books

Ok, so you printed a ton of workbooks and books for your kids but how do you bind those homeschool books so you won’t have papers flying everywhere?

There are lots of options when it comes to choosing a homeschooling curriculum format. I prefer ebooks, PDFs, and digital formats when possible. I wrote about these and how I chose the cheapest option available when it comes to curriculum.

Now it’s time to talk about binding.

This post contains Amazon and other affiliate links. Read the disclosure at the end of the post for more details.

10 ways to bind homeschool books at home monkeyandmom

I’ll cover 10 ways to bind homeschool books at home ranging from the cheapest to the most expensive. For some, you might even have the necessary tools in your home. ❤️

Of course, you can do the printing and binding at a copy-center nearby, but this article is for those among us that have no print-center around or that just want to so it themselves.

1. Staple and Tape

homeschool binding tape and staple monkeyandmom

This one’s easy and it’s great for little readers.

There are a lot of websites where you get free readers for your kids, like Progressive Phonics. Their books are more of a textbook style but you could make little readers out of them for kids that feel overwhelmed with a lot of pages in front of them.

So investing a lot in printing and binding readers that are just a few pages long and will just be used once or twice isn’t worth it.

The staples can hurt little fingers though, that’s why you can use tape to secure the book and avoid injuries.

It’s very easy to do, you just staple the edges of the paper then use the tape to cover them.

I used washi tape for this one to cover the back of the staples, but you can use any type of tape.

UK buyers:

Romanian buyers:

2. Punch and Tie

punch and tie binding technique homeschool binding monkeyandmom

Another easy way to bind homeschool books at home is to punch 2 holes (or 4) and just tie twine through them. It won’t look the prettiest but it does the job.

You can use this to even bind worksheets or all kinds of papers that your kids worked on and you want to keep.

So this technique is best for things you want to keep organized, not stuff that you use regularly.

I’ve been using it for daily things I don’t much care about, like daily planner pages, or note pages.

3. Binder Clips

binder clips binding homeschool books at home monkeyandmom

A quick way to bind those worksheets or notes is to use binder clips.

I love the ones that come with smiley faces and in all colors but even the regular black ones will do.
This is a perfect way to bind art without spoiling it, too.

UK buyers:

Romanian buyers:

4. Binding Bars

Binder strips for homeschooling books monkeyandmom

The fastest way to bind anything is with binding bars.

I use these for all the temporary worksheets or things that won’t get used long-term, like PDFs for an online class and such.

They won’t hold the papers as well as other methods discussed here, so don’t use them for a lot of pages.


The good thing about these is that you can reuse them and they look great!

UK buyers:

Romanian buyers:

5. Folders with Prongs

prong files binding for homeschooling books monkeyandmom

Another quick way of binding workbooks is just punching the papers and storing them into folders with prongs. This is great for storing papers too.

I like using the Plus Japan expandable folders and some plastic index sheets to split the workbooks into weeks. It works great.

You can use plastic index sheets to create various tabs for separate subjects or areas of study.

6. Ring Binders

ring binder book binding for homeschool monkeyandmom

I’ve tried to love ring binders but we have a love-hate relationship. They work great for some families.

I can’t make them work for us, but they are a great, cheap, reusable solution.

We are using them this year to do our IEW work but some papers always find their way outside of the binder.

Next year, we will just stick to using notebooks for composition.

UK buyers:

Romanian buyers:

7. Pre-punched Paper and Plastic Coils

punched paper and coil binding at home monkeyandmom

Did you know you can just get pre-punched paper, print on it and then you can hand-bind the books at home with plastic spiral coils?

How cool and easy is that!

Just make sure that your printer works with these pre-punched papers before buying.

Another aspect to keep in mind when buying these and the coils is the pitch size! Make sure both the paper and the coil are made with the same pitch.

The suggestions I give in my links are compatible.

Romanian buyers:

  • NA

8. Plastic Comb Binding

plastic comb binder homeschooling monkeyandmom

This is the binding technique we’ve been using for several years now. It requires the following elements:

It’s the cheapest type of binding, a great investment, and it saves you a lot of headaches.

To see our old binding machine and how we use it, read more here.

I bound all our homeschooling books like this for several years and it’s been very practical and easy.

Benefits:

-affordable

-easy to use

Cons:

-doesn’t open 360°

-some pages could slip off (I used superglue on the daily workbooks)

9. Coil and Spiral Binding

spiral binding homeschooling books monkeyandmom

These are the next level!

The wire or spiral bindings look more elegant and they allow you to turn the book 360 degrees, making it easy to work on.

Spiral and wire binding is the techinque we upgraded to this year and so far I love it!

You will need the following (make sure the pitch here is 3:1!)

Read more details below and see the video to see how it works.

Benefits:

-can use both wire coils and plastic spirals

-can open 360°

Cons:

-its bulkier

-more expensive

10. Thermal Binding

heat binding homeschooling books monkeyandmom

If you want professional-looking books, then thermal binding is for you.

This type of binding requires special thermal covers. Make sure you read the number of pages that each cover will be able to bind.

These books will have (almost) the feel of store-bought books.

I don’t think you can go beyond this binding at home, but if you know of something even better, let me know in the comments.

My Favorite Binding Machine – The Wire and Spiral Binder

I previously wrote about our banding machine here but this year I decided to upgrade from plastic coils to spiral binding, so I upgraded our binder.

You can see the comparison between the two binders I own below. I prefer the spiral binder, even if I have to manually add the spirals.

The binder I chose was TPPS iBind UW15. Unfortunately, this model is not available in the USA, so for my American readers, I did some research and found a similar model: Rayson TD-1500B34. UK readers, please check the links above.

If you wish for an automatic way to insert spiral coils, get the Coilbind S-15. It even has an electric coil inserter so you won’t have to do it manually like I have to. But this machine won’t work with metal coils. This electric machine has a pitch of 4:1 so pick the coils accordingly!

I love the new binder I have because:

  • I can use it for spiral binding or wire binding!
  • It punches 15 pages at once as compared to 12 like the previous one
  • When I opem the books I bind, there’s no gap (the comb bount book won’t open fully). They turn 360 degrees.
  • I can use both wire and spirals to bind the books, so I have 2 options for binding

The downside of these machines is that they are more expensive and heavier than the plastic comb binders.

Here’s a comparison for the comb and spiral-bound books. Pull the slider up and down to see them better. The blue binding is comb and the transparent one spiral.

comb binding monkeyandmomSpiral Binding monkeyandmom
IEW Student Resource Packet/ Evan Moor Daily Academic Vocabulary 6

And because I’ve mentioned that our machine can use both spiral and wire binders, here’s how a wire binding looks like:

coil binding homeschooling books monkeyandmom
Science Mom 2022 calendar

Some Extras and Advice

When you buy your machine, make sure you buy the matching coils or combs.

For coils, you have to check the pitch of the machine and get matching coils, whether they are metal or plastic spirals. The most common are 3:1 and 4:1 pitch. The pitch is just the pacing of the holes and it means holes per inch.

You also have to pay attention to the size. There are various sizes of coils and combs for different numbers of pages. To choose the right size, think about what books you want to bind and make an average of their pages. I always pick different sizes from 16mm to 30 mm. These are usually covering most of my binding needs.

You will need to purchase some sort of covers for your books. This is optional, but they protect your book. For the front cover, you can use transparent foil and for the back cover you casn use cardstock.

To get all the supplies I presented in this post, visit my Amazon USA Idea List or Amazon UK Idea List.

Here’s the video I made for this post:

best tools for homeschool

This post may contain affiliate links. By making a purchase through these links, I get a small percentage for the item you bought while the price stays the same for you. Thank you for supporting me.
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Read my Disclosure to find out more about how I support my website and how you can help.

close

Don’t miss my new posts & freebies!

I don’t spam and only send about one newsletter per month! Read my privacy policy for more info.

One Response

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.